Clean Energy

transforming-the-grid

California's energy system is undergoing a radical transformation driven by disruptive technologies, consumer preferences, and aggressive clean energy policies. The old paradigm of central suppliers serving passive customers is giving way to a more decentralized and digitized system, with modular and smart technologies generating and controlling energy with greater efficiency and higher value. An increasingly clean power system is also key to decarbonizing other parts of the economy, including transportation — the largest source of statewide emissions — and heat.

regional-power-market-west

A Regional Power Market for the West: Risks and Benefits takes a fresh look at the pros and cons of creating a Western regional grid, and illuminates the complexities that have helped stall bills addressing the issue over the past three years. Grid regionalization could change how and where renewables are built, bought and sold, with ramifications for energy markets in California and across the West.

Ninth annual Green Innovation Index finds California clean economy thriving but emissions-reduction challenges loom; transportation sector emissions spike, pose major challenges to state's 2030 climate goals

First comprehensive cost/benefit study of state climate policies in Inland Empire finds $9.1 billion in direct economic benefits and over 41,000 direct jobs over seven years

1st comprehensive cost/benefit study of climate policies in San Joaquin Valley finds over $13 billion in economic benefits, mostly in renewable energy

Eighth annual California Green Innovation Index find explosive growth in solar generation; clean technology hotspots in unexpected places

This year's California Green Innovation Index tracks key economic and environmental indicators at the regional, state, and international level.

New report finds that California remains a leader in renewable energy production while its residents use less energy and have lower energy bills than other Americans.

With the economic toll of California's drought expected to hit $2.74 billion for 2015, water suppliers, investors and urban and agricultural users are seeking ways to reduce water consumption.

"Energy policies that promote efficiency and reduce energy bills are contributing to the state's manufacturing success," said F. Noel Perry, businessman and founder of the nonprofit nonpartisan Next 10. "Even with the most aggressive carbon pollution reduction policies in the nation, California remains the top state for manufacturing."

 

This new Next 10 report analyzes transportation policies in the Scoping Plan, including the "Pavley" regulations or vehicle emissions standards (key findings pg. 13), the Zero Emission Vehicle regulation (key findings pg. 29), SB 375 (key findings pg. 50), the Low Carbon Fuel Standard (key findings pg. 71), and the "fuels in the cap" component of the AB 32 cap-and-trade program (key findings pg. 88). 

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