Press Coverage

April 24, 2017
by Rob Nikolewski
The San Diego Union-Tribune

In an indication of just how much California is affected by gasoline prices, at least three different groups on Monday weighed in on the ramifications of Senate Bill 1, the $52.4 billion effort passed by Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature earlier this month.

One organization that concentrates on policy solutions to reduce California’s greenhouse gas emissions said that while SB1 is “a good start,” it ultimately won’t provide a long-range solution for keeping the state’s roads in good shape.

April 24, 2017
KPCC

This is no secret to drivers: California's roads are falling apart.

The state legislature approved SB-1, Governor Brown's proposal for raising the gas tax to try to fix them.

But a new report released today by Beacon Economics and the nonprofit group Next 10 believes that taxing gas simply will not generate enough revenue to get the job done.

Adam Fowler is the manager of public policy research at Beacon. He spoke to Take Two's A Martinez to explain the report

On how much money the plan will generate to fulfill the needs of our roads:

March 28, 2017
by Ethan Elkind, Carol Galante, and F. Noel Perry
Capitol Weekly

They say the real estate agent’s mantra is “location, location, location.” And when it comes to crafting smart housing policy, location is key, as well.

As California legislators consider more than 130 bills designed to tackle the state’s housing crisis, they should consider ways to encourage infill housing — compact housing in already urbanized land near transit, jobs, and services.

March 28, 2017
by Jeff Wattenhofer
Curbed Los Angeles

City planners in post-Measure S Los Angeles are beginning to work on updating LA’s 35 individual community plans, and the big question is how hard officials will push for increased housing density.

Density opponents may decry the so-called Manhattanization of their city, but there may be a new reason to support a taller, denser Los Angeles: Increased housing density might combat climate change, according to a new study by the think tank Next 10.

March 28, 2017
by Erik Anderson
KPBS

A pair of UC Berkeley researchers tried to gauge the impact of different housing development strategies on that state's desire to meet its goal to reduce global warming gas emissions.

The researchers considered city planning that allowed for sprawl, had some in-fill housing and focused planning efforts on increasing density in cities.

The research was funded by the nonpartisan think tank Next 10.

The study found densely developed communities reduced the need to drive and that put fewer greenhouse gasses into the air.

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