Press Coverage

January 30, 2018
by Paul A. Eisenstein
The Detroit Bureau

Despite a slow start, California should be able to hit its ambitious goal of putting 1.5 million zero-emissions vehicles, or ZEVs, on the road by 2025, according to a new study.

January 30, 2018
by Erik Anderson
KPBS

California's ambitious goal of putting hundreds of thousands more electric vehicles on the road is possible. A new study by Beacon Economics and the nonpartisan group Next 10 finds the state is adding zero-emission vehicles quickly.

Next 10 founder Noel Perry said there are already more than 300,000 electric vehicles on California roads, and he expects the jump to increase quickly, much like smartphone use took off a few years after they hit the market.

January 30, 2018
by Susan Carpenter
SCPR

Governor Jerry Brown last week declared that California should have 5 million electric vehicles on the road by 2030. He signed an executive order Friday, upping his earlier goal of just 1.5 million EVs by 2025.

It's a tall order no matter how you slice it, but a new report out today from the nonpartisan think tank Next 10 says the state's on track to at least meet Brown's first goal.

January 30, 2018
by Craig Miller
KQED

California is significantly upping the ante in its quest to get more electric cars on the road.

In his final State-of-the-State address this week, Governor Jerry Brown laid out the state’s ambitions for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Then, he dropped something startling.

“To meet these ambitious goals,” Brown tossed out almost casually, “we’ll need five million zero-emission vehicles on the road by 2030, and we’re gonna get there, believe me.”

January 30, 2018
by Sean Kilcarr
FleetOwner

So I spent some time at the 2018 Washington Auto Show, reviewing a whole host of light-duty vehicles – everything from pickup trucks and cargo vans to sports cars, with a few “classics” interspersed in there for good measure.

Two in particular caught my eye: the latest iteration of the Nissan Leaf all-electric battery-powered sedan and the experimental FCR (short for “Fine Comfort Ride”) fuel cell-fired prototype built by Toyota.

So why should truckers care about these small vehicles; ones that can’t haul a decent of load of freight?

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