Press Coverage

April 14, 2016
by Liam Dillon
LA Times

The reason why California faces a housing affordability crisis is simple, many experts say: Lots of people want to live in the state and there aren’t enough houses for them.

“You don’t need a PhD in economics to understand this,” said Christopher Thornberg, an economist who recently published a report on state housing costs with the nonpartisan organization Next 10. “It’s basic supply and demand.”

March 7, 2016
by Irvin Dawid
Planetizen

The Golden State attracts high-end workers, while its high housing costs cause a disproportionate number of low and middle income workers to flee the state. The non-profit think tank, Next 10, delves into this crisis in three new reports.

The California Report nicely summarized the findings of the three reports in this one-and-one half-minute audio report:

March 6, 2016
The San Diego Union-Tribune

Three new studies commissioned by Next 10 — a San Francisco think tank that focuses on quality of life in California — make a powerful case that extreme housing costs threaten to make much of the state like Malibu and Santa Barbara, where only the wealthy can afford to live and most of the workers who support them have long commutes from cheaper inland areas. The analyses — prepared by Beacon Economics, a respected Los Angeles-based consultant — make a powerful case that the focus of state anti-poverty efforts should be bringing down housing costs.

March 4, 2016
by Riley McDermid
San Francisco Business Times

Three new studies show that although California has one of the highest rates of job growth in the country, its cost of housing and high-wage jobs could push lower earners out of the state as they seek someplace more affordable.

The three reports – Current State of the California Housing Market, California Migration and California Employment by Income– were commissioned by San Francisco-based nonprofit Next 10 and prepared by Beacon Economics.

March 4, 2016
by Elijah Chiland
Curbed Los Angeles

Everyone knows that California has a severe shortage of housing, but studies released this week illustrate just how dire the situation has become. The three reports were prepared by Beacon Economics and released by Next 10, a nonprofit group founded by Bay Area venture capitalist F. Noel Perry. The findings suggest that Californians are finding home ownership increasingly unattainable, with middle- and lower-income earners are literally being priced right out of the state.

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