Press Coverage

February 28, 2019
by Liam Dillon
LA Times

California’s housing supply law has failed in its goal of spurring enough new home building to meet demand, especially for low-income residents, according to a new report from public policy think tank Next 10.

February 28, 2019
by Kathleen Pender
SF Chronicle

Figuring out which California cities and counties are doing the best — or worst — job of creating housing is no easy task, but a report issued Thursday by Beacon Economics makes an attempt.

The report grades each of California’s 539 cities and counties based on their progress toward meeting goals set out in the Regional Housing Needs Assessment. This is a statewide program that determines how much housing a local jurisdiction should create at four different income levels over a five- or eight-year cycle.

March 14, 2019
by Cynthia Sweeney
Napa Valley Register

The good news is, while the rest of the state isn’t doing so well, “tiny” Calistoga gets high marks when it comes to providing housing.

The not-so-good news is that the assessment process that sets the bar is flawed.

A report that came out in February issued grades for California’s 539 cities and counties based on their progress toward meeting goals set out in the Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA). RHNA is a statewide program that determines how much housing a local jurisdiction should create at four different income levels during a five- or eight-year cycle.

March 13, 2019
by Adam Brinklow
Curbed SF

California is not building enough housing. On that point most observers agree. The only question is how big the problem is.

In February, public policy group Next 10 and research firm Beacon Economics released an analysis of the housing crisis titled “Missing the Mark,” which excoriates the states Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) as an inadequate and almost vestigial means of spurring housing production.

February 28, 2019
by Louis Hansen
The Mercury News

Housing construction in California is lagging so badly, it would take some towns and cities centuries at their current construction pace to meet state goals to build homes for low- and middle-income families, according to a new analysis.

But in some Bay Area cities, new construction for high earners is way ahead of schedule.

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